Kirsty Allan

Kirsty
Allan

Practice Lead

Kirsty is a Political Due Diligence Practice Lead at Global Counsel. Kirsty has five years of experience in British domestic politics, public policy and regulation, and spent the last two years working on M&A transactions advising on political and policy exposure associated with assets in the UK.

Prior to joining Global Counsel, Kirsty worked for a political consultancy, advising private equity on the political risks of investments and working on a range of deals spanning a variety of sectors and jurisdictions. She has worked in UK politics for four years, for two former Ministers of State, from the Home Office and the Department of Health. She has also worked for the National Audit Office and for a policy think tank.

At Global Counsel, Kirsty is part of the Political Due Diligence team advising Global Counsel clients on UK and EU regulation, policymaking and politics risks within a transaction. Kirsty has worked with private equity clients on a wide range of policy areas including education, health and social care, business services and energy. She advises on opportunities at the point of investment and on strategies to manage political change through an investment cycle.

Read posts by Kirsty on the Global Counsel blog.

Articles by Kirsty Allan on the GC Blog and GC analysis

Small parties – big deal?

Author: 
Allan
1 Aug 2017
|
Region: 
UK

One of the general conclusions from the recent UK general election was that it had marked a dramatic return to two party politics in the UK.  Voters provided the Conservatives and the Labour Party with the highest combined share of the vote since the 1970s, at over 82%, and almost 90% of the seats in Parliament. The Conservatives saw their highest vote share since 1983 at the election. Labour surged to over 40% for the first time since 1997.

May’s Manifesto – The Ins and Outs

Author: 
Allan
25 Apr 2017
|
Region: 
UK

With the UK now set for a general election on 8 June, attention has turned to the party manifestos. Given the general expectation that the Conservatives will win a large new majority, their platform is of particular interest. With very little constraining political opposition, UK Prime Minister Theresa May has the freedom to be as innovative as her admittedly cautious nature allows. The election is a chance to formalise her own, post-David Cameron agenda: a manifesto version of what she has already done with her cabinet. What she says on Europe and Brexit will be picked through minutely. So, what should we look for from a May manifesto?

Brexit and the future of UK immigration policy

Authors: 
Allan
Smith
16 Jan 2017
|
Region: 
UK

UK Prime Minister Theresa May has all but ruled out maintaining freedom of movement between the UK and EU post-Brexit. This implies a new migration system, providing recruitment challenges for a range of sectors from social care to agriculture. Businesses should now plan to adapt, but policy flux is not all bad news, with some distinct opportunities arising, especially should the government seek to integrate its approach to migration with industrial policy. Here we look at what will shape the impact.

Is Donald Trump about to become an exception to the ‘October 31 rule’?

Author: 
Allan
21 Oct 2016
|
Region: 
Americas

Donald Trump’s performance in the third and final presidential debate seems unlikely to do much to stem his plummeting popularity. It is not unusual for presidential campaigns to be tawdry affairs but the last couple of weeks has seen the race between Trump and Hillary Clinton shock even seasoned political commentators. The clip of audio revealing Trump’s amused commentary on how his status allowed him to grope women has been followed by a slew of further accusations and now an apparent willingness to refuse to accept the election outcome.