Blogs

Does the migration stick for Visegrad countries require a carrot as well?

Author: 

Alexander
Smotrov

Email: 
[email protected]
15 Jun 2017
|
Region: 
EU/Eurozone

Migration has drawn the most serious division line between the ‘old’ and ‘new’ EU member states in a decade. This week’s European Commission infringement decision against Poland, Hungary and Czech Republic for their refusal to pledge to accept refugees is just another strong indication of that.

How Trump shakes up the Middle East

Author: 

Thomas
Gratowski

Email: 
[email protected]
13 Jun 2017
|
Region: 
Multilateral

It’s only been three weeks since Trump’s visit to Saudi Arabia, but the repercussions could be felt the moment he left. Only a few hours after his departure to Israel, Bahraini security forces stormed a Shiite village where protesters had staged sit-ins in support of a top Shiite cleric, who Manama accused of supporting foreign interests, meaning Iran. A week later, Egypt’s President Al Sisi enacted a new law restricting NGOs. Up until then, he had been reluctant to sign the law because of pressure from US Congressmen. And a week ago, Qatar was isolated by half a dozen Arab states, not least because its critical Al Jazeera news station has annoyed their leaders for many years.

Was 2017 really a Brexit election?

Author: 

Roberto
Robles

Email: 
[email protected]
13 Jun 2017
|
Region: 
UK

At the start of the election campaign, 2017 was meant to be the election that delivered Theresa May a strong mandate for Brexit as both Leave voters and pragmatic Remainers trusted her to get on with the job of implementing the referendum result. Meanwhile, Labour was supposed to be headed for a 1983-style defeat under the left-wing Jeremy Corbyn, losing Remain voters to the strongly pro-EU Liberal Democrats. The outcome of course was very different.

Au revoir Donald: is US withdrawal from Paris an opportunity for European climate leadership?

Author: 

Matthew
Duhan

Email: 
[email protected]
2 Jun 2017
|
Region: 
Multilateral

On Thursday, self-proclaimed deal maker Donald Trump turned ‘deal breaker’, as he announced his decision to withdraw from the Paris Agreement. The decision provoked condemnation from an extraordinary spectrum of political and business leaders, and the US now appears on course to leave at some point towards the end of 2020. Soon after the announcement, some European commentators made the counterintuitive case that the Trump decision may actually be an opportunity for European climate leadership. Do they have a point?

Could TTIP really be relaunched?

Author: 

Guillaume
Ferlet

Email: 
[email protected]
1 Jun 2017
|
Region: 
Multilateral

On Tuesday, US Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross gave the clearest sign yet that the US administration might have an interest in reviving the TTIP negotiations. Ross told media that it “makes sense” to continue negotiating the deal that slipped into a coma just before the Obama administration left office.

A German-German motor for the EU27?

Author: 

Tom
White

Email: 
[email protected]
26 May 2017
|
Region: 
EU/Eurozone

Attention in the European Council has turned from unity over Brexit to whether France and Germany can find a unifying policy direction for the EU27. The view in Paris is that Franco-German compromises offer a realistic balance between the interests of member states in the west, east, north and south, and that a joint platform is more achievable without the need to take account of a London outlier, especially on economic policy and defence cooperation. 

Is the ECJ judgement a big deal for a big EU-UK deal?

Author: 

Stephen
Adams

Email: 
[email protected]
22 May 2017
|
Region: 
EU/Eurozone

Last week’s ECJ judgement on the ‘mixity’ question in EU trade agreements was a big one for EU trade policy. The ECJ overturned the Advocate General and years of practice by declaring that almost all of the things the European Commission negotiates on in FTAs should be treated in this respect as the exclusive competence of the EU. This includes big areas like transport policy, labour and environmental rights and IP protection.

The British Conservatives: May in the middle

Author: 

Jade
Rickman

Email: 
[email protected]
19 May 2017
|
Region: 
UK

The election manifesto of the governing UK Conservative Party published yesterday was the most ambitious attempt to redefine British conservatism since the 1980s. It did this not by calling for radical policy change – it recommitted to radical policies like Brexit and set out a wide range of aims and ideas but little that is new – but by ambitious repositioning and some big rhetorical departures. Gone is Margaret Thatcher’s minimal State; Gone is David Cameron’s ‘Big Society’ of self-helpers. 

Draghi’s monetary policy predicament

Author: 

Gregor
Irwin

Email: 
[email protected]
18 May 2017
|
Region: 
EU/Eurozone

If you want to understand the predicament facing ECB Governor Mario Draghi you need look no further than estimates of long-run real interest rates for the major eurozone economies.

Thinking out loud on globalisation

Author: 

Gregor
Irwin

Email: 
[email protected]
11 May 2017
|
Region: 
EU/Eurozone

The European Commission published this week its assessment of how the benefits of globalisation can be harnessed, while addressing the anxieties that are also created and which are impacting on political debates across Europe.