Blogs

Less taxation for… more representation

Author: 

Thomas
Gratowski

Email: 
[email protected]
14 Oct 2016
|
Region: 
EU/Eurozone

The German federal election is less than a year away and strategists in the two large coalition parties are both preparing to answer the same question: how to change the subject from migration. This week hinted at the likely answer, and it is not a particularly novel one: money.

The 100,000 person question

Author: 

Leo
Ringer

Email: 
[email protected]
13 Oct 2016
|
Region: 
UK

Immigration is the simmering political issue at the heart of Brexit. Much of the debate has focused on how far the UK can reclaim control of EU migration into the UK, while retaining some form of participation in, or preferential access to, the single market. But what if we assume that full migration policy is back in the hands of the UK government. How does it meet the palpable public expectation it has created?

In the Brexit divorce, who gets custody of the EU’s FTAs?

Author: 

Stephen
Adams

Email: 
[email protected]
12 Oct 2016
|
Region: 
EU/Eurozone

Like many divorces, Brexit is going to be a custody battle of sorts. UK Secretary of State for International Trade Liam Fox has warned (via his preferred UK newspapers) his EU counterparts that attempts to prevent the UK inheriting a large number of FTAs signed on the UK’s behalf by the EU could be met with retaliation by those EU trading partners. This is, in essence, the question of who gets custody of the EU’s FTAs after Brexit.

Indonesia opens a new front in the GAFA wars

Author: 

Ying
Staton

Email: 
[email protected]
30 Sep 2016
|
Region: 
ASEAN

ASEAN policymakers have always watched their European counterparts closely – both for good and bad examples. The European Commission’s landmark decision last month instructing Ireland to claw back €13 billion of unpaid corporate tax from Apple is no exception.

EU tuition fees post-Brexit: feast or famine?

Author: 

Leo
Ringer

Email: 
[email protected]
28 Sep 2016
|
Region: 
UK

In a week when a UK university, Oxford, was crowned the best in the world, it’s worth reminding ourselves that Brexit gives the British higher education sector a lot to chew on. The potential loss of research funding and restricted access to top EU talent are headline concerns, but here’s a different question: what happens once EU students become classified as ‘international’? Does the changing fee dynamic mean feast or famine for UK universities?

From scary film to horror movie – European Parliament plans to tighten the noose around online platforms

26 Sep 2016
|
Region: 
EU/Eurozone

For online platforms it was scary enough to see the Commission’s proposals for revising the Audio-Visual Media Services (AVMS) directive earlier this year. This afternoon, when the rapporteurs present their draft amendments in the European Parliament, they may well be horrified.

Brexit and the audio-visual sector – facing up to life outside the single market

Author: 

Conan
D'Arcy

Email: 
[email protected]
26 Sep 2016
|
Region: 
EU/Eurozone

As Whitehall limbers up for the UK’s exit negotiations from the European Union by establishing new departments and recruiting new staff, it will be some time before the government reaches its full capacity for managing the negotiations. Before this point, however, fundamental decisions will need to be taken about the direction of the negotiations, such as whether to continue participating in the EU’s single market and the likely direction of the UK’s new immigration policy. In this period, economic sectors face a competition for advocacy to influence the limited capacity of Whitehall. Much of the focus has so far been on the sectors perceived to be most exposed to exiting the EU such as banks and automotives. As delegates meet tomorrow for the Royal Television Society conference, the interests of the audio-visual sector will be at the fore.

Support for outward investment: a questionable solution to a misdiagnosed problem

Author: 

Gregor
Irwin

Email: 
[email protected]
26 Sep 2016
|
Region: 
UK

International Trade Secretary Liam Fox slipped out an important change in policy earlier this month when he told Conservative MPs that from now on the government would give the same weight to supporting outward investment as it does to inward investment. His concern is the deterioration in the current account. Inward investment may bring jobs, but foreign companies want a return on their investment which, according to Fox, is a problem, unless there is a matching flow coming in the opposite direction. Leaving aside questions about the economic rationale for the policy change, does the data suggest the government’s concerns are justified in the first place?

Will the EU's new cybersecurity law prevent another Yahoo?

Author: 

Conan
D'Arcy

Email: 
[email protected]
23 Sep 2016
|
Region: 
EU/Eurozone

The data security world has been rocked by Yahoo’s revelation that it had been the victim of a “state sponsored” hack leading to the exposure of 500 million user accounts. Beyond the sheer scale of the breach, its significance lies in the apparent lack of transparency with users, who were only notified this week when the incident is reported to have occurred in 2014. This opacity does not appear limited to Yahoo’s customers since even Verizon, which is acquiring Yahoo for $4.8 billion, has issued a public statement clarifying that it had only received “limited information and understanding of the impact”.

United Russia victory as a silver bullet for PM Medvedev

Author: 

Alexander
Smotrov

Email: 
[email protected]
22 Sep 2016
|
Region: 
Russia & CIS

The pro-Kremlin United Russia party secured a supermajority of 76% of the seats in the State Duma elections earlier this week. The result reflected changes to the boundaries (merging rural and urban areas), voting system (combining single constituency and lists) and indeed the season (from mid-winter to early autumn). These changes led to a rock solid position for United Russia deputies in the parliament, a reduced turnout and no repeat of the street protests that gave Vladimir Putin his closest brush with mortality in the winter of 2011.